Our Location in Ghana

Cape Three Points Village

Cape Three Points Forest Reserve to the North

Trinity Yard School

About our Location

Cape Three Points Village

Located in Ghana’s Western Ahanta Region, Cape Three Points sits at the southernmost point of the country. It is comprised of a small fishing village, beaches, rocky points and vistas along the some of the most pristine coastline in all of West Africa. 

The shores provide habitat and protection for sea turtle nesting grounds, migrating humpback whales, dolphins and many more species, while the coastal forests are home to a wide variety of colorful birds and butterflies. The village is bordered by The Cape Three Points Forest Reserve on the north, steep coastal hills to the west, and a tidal river to the east.

The inhabitants of the village are Nzema people, most of whom are fishermen and farmers. On their daily trips out to sea, the men navigate beautiful wooden boats fitted with large nets or smaller hand-paddled dugout canoes. At night, these boats line the western beach, where goats, sheep and villagers alike take advantage of the cool sea breeze.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

The villagers’ main source of potable water is a hand-pump well installed by the NGO World Vision. Mornings and evenings, villagers collect water for cooking and drinking. Even the smallest children balance basins on their heads, carefully stepping along the rocky paths back to their outdoor kitchens. Food is cooked over open fires of both wood and charcoal, and is typically served in dishes meant to be shared by two or more people.

Electricity finally arrived in the village in 2014, but many families still use kerosene lamps after dark. A solar-powered lighthouse (rebuilt by the British in the 1920s) remains the only real tourist attraction to the few travelers who make it down the long road to the village.

Trinity Yard Campus

TYS School Building

Trinity Yard school’s campus is situated on a hill overlooking sweeping beaches, crashing waves and rocky coves to the south, and the rolling hills of Cape Three Points Forest reserve to the north. We have planted many varieties of fruit and nut trees on the property and maintain erosion-free grounds, with Bermuda grass carpeting the area. The main school building is roughly 3800 square feet, consisting of three classrooms – two for academics and the last impressively filled with 22 kente weaving looms.

Up the spiral staircase to the second floor is our Library, stocked with thousands of books, accessible to the entire community. The very top of the school is a cupola, where hot air leave and light enters, and school bell rings at the end of each day.

The Yard

The eastern cluster of buildings is called the Yard. The Yard is where our staff and volunteers eat, sleep, and hang out. The Yard is also home to a number of current projects aimed at achieving self-sustainability, including composting toilets, vegetable gardens, water purification systems, and a solar electricity installation.

There are two spacious bungalows that house volunteers and student groups. These dormitory-style accommodations are situated at the base of a path that leads up a small hill to the school. Down the path towards the beach are three more bungalows, housing our Ghanaian staff and long-term volunteers. All of our bungalows are made of wood or cement and are designed to handle the intense downpours of the rainy season. 

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

The Yard lacks many of the distractions that pervade our lives in the 21st century. At night, the only sounds are the chirping crickets and the crashing waves. There are no lights for miles; the moon and the stars are spectacular in the clear night sky. At the Yard, you can relax in a hammock overlooking the ocean or have a surf session on our local breaks. Trinity Yard School is a special place for both visitors and permanent staff alike – most feel ready to call it “home” after just a few days.

Cape Three Points Forest Reserve

Three kilometers to the north of the village is the forest reserve, the last protected, primary coastal forest in Ghana. It is sanctuary to many endangered species of birds, monkeys, and butterflies. The 51,102-square-kilometer forest, declared a reserve in 1949, is abundant in many varieties of trees and medicinal plants, with collections dating back to 1780. Though the forest has endured some illegal timber harvesting and gold mining, it remains fairly well protected.

Three kilometers to the north of the village is the forest reserve, the last protected, primary coastal forest in Ghana. It is sanctuary to many endangered species of birds, monkeys, and butterflies. The 51,102-square-kilometer forest, declared a reserve in 1949, is abundant in many varieties of trees and medicinal plants, with collections dating back to 1780. Though the forest has endured some illegal timber harvesting and gold mining, it remains fairly well protected.

Environmental Concerns

Cape Three Points has recently been the focus of Ghanaian attention due to the 2007 discovery of offshore oil. Though there is yet to be clear evidence that this will directly affect the village, the discovery of offshore oil adds to the need for a vocational-based school for the youth in the area, to help them create a more sustainable future. 

The most evident environmental concern is the loss of forest and farm land due to the industrial-scale rubber farming, where copious use of chemical herbicides and fertilizers pollute soils and water tables. A key part of the Trinity Yard School’s curriculum is premised on our belief that education in organic and sustainable practices of farming will be crucial to the healthy future of the surrounding communities.

Share via
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap